Knowledge is the best first-line of defence

It’s easy to overlook how much important personal information is electronically stored on our devices. We carry them around everywhere we go, capturing almost every detail of our lives through photos, messages, emails and apps. We rarely consider how vulnerable we are to cybercrime. And that’s why, like a wallet or passport, we should take extra measure to protect our information from cybercriminals.

The good news is that we can safeguard ourselves from cybercrime better than anyone else because knowledge is the best first-line of defence.

Definition

Cybercrime is any crime where the internet and information technologies, like computers, tablets, or mobile devices play a substantial role in the commission of a criminal offence.

 

Cyber-smart Routine

A cyber-smart routine means you actively look for signs that a website is secure and set up measures like anti-virus programs to keep your information safe.

Tips for your cyber-smart routine


  1. Create strong online banking passwords and update them often
  2. Never log in to online banking using a link sent through email, text message, or social media. Instead, type the address into your browser
  3. Don’t share your login information with anyone, even if they claim to be a representative of Coast Capital. We will never ask you for that information by email, text or phone
  4. Avoid banking on public Wi-Fi. Public Wi-Fi services are not secured. If you need to access online banking when outside your home, it’s safest to use your data
  5. Always sign out and close your app or web browser after you finish online banking


Tips for your cyber-smart routine


  1. Create strong online banking passwords and update them often
  2. Never log in to online banking using a link sent through email, text message, or social media. Instead, type the address into your browser
  3. Don’t share your login information with anyone, even if they claim to be a representative of Coast Capital. We will never ask you for that information by email, text or phone
  4. Avoid banking on public Wi-Fi. Public Wi-Fi services are not secured. If you need to access online banking when outside your home, it’s safest to use your data
  5. Always sign out and close your app or web browser after you finish online banking


Watch our videos on how to protect yourself digitally

How to protect yourself online

Shopping, banking, networking – you name it, we do it online. It’s also a point of weakness for fraudsters to exploit, so it’s important you take precautions to make sure you don’t fall victim to cybercrime.

Protecting yourself on your phone

We get it – your phone is your lifeline. We like our phones just as much as the next person, but it’s important to make sure you’re using it safely.




What is phishing?


Phishing is one of the more common cybercrimes. It’s when fraudsters send emails, texts or other kinds of messages that coerce you to click on a link.

They’re “phishing” for information – get it? If you click on the link, it’ll either install malware onto your computer or link you to what looks like a legitimate trusted website. Both are an effort to obtain your username, passwords, banking and account information and/or other personal information like your Social Insurance Number/Social Security Number, date of birth and an email address.


Learn all about phishing on our Help Hub.




What is phishing?


Phishing is one of the more common cybercrimes. It’s when fraudsters send emails, texts or other kinds of messages that coerce you to click on a link.

They’re “phishing” for information – get it? If you click on the link, it’ll either install malware onto your computer or link you to what looks like a legitimate trusted website. Both are an effort to obtain your username, passwords, banking and account information and/or other personal information like your Social Insurance Number/Social Security Number, date of birth and an email address.


Learn all about phishing on our Help Hub.


Phishing features to watch out for

Names

If you don’t recognize the person who sent it, then don’t open any links they direct you to. Scan the CC section to see if you recognize anyone else. It’s also a good idea to check if it’s been sent to “undisclosed recipients”.

Spelling and grammar

If spelling and grammar are poor then chances are the message wasn’t sent from a reputable source or company.

Urgency

If it says “urgent action needed”, “your account has been compromised” or prompts you to act fast by threatening to close an account you can safely assume it’s phishing—they’re just trying to force you to click out of panic.

Website URL

If you’re shopping online or just surfing the net and you happen to click on a website you’re unsure of, check the URL for misspelled words or missing periods in the name. These could be indicators of a fraudulent website.

Channels used for phishing

Email

The most common phishing method is email. That’s when someone contacts you through your email address prompting you to click on fraudulent links.
SMS (texts)

You can be phished through a text message. It could be someone pretending to be your service provider prompting you to click on fraudulent links.
Social Media

his is when a company or person reaches out to you through private, or sometimes public, messages on your social media account prompting you to click on fraudulent links.

Protect your computer with updates

Keep your computer up to date

Ensure your operating system, web browser, and applications have the most current updates. See the videos on our Online Banking Security page to learn more.

Internet browser

Make sure you have a current version of your Internet browser installed. We only support an Internet browser that supports 128-bit encryption.

Clean your cache

Secure or erase files stored on your PC by your Internet browser so others cannot read them. Most Internet browsers store information in non-protected (unencrypted) files in the browser's cache to improve performance.

Anti-virus program

Install and use a quality anti-virus program and ensure it is updated regularly. See the videos on our Online Banking Security page to learn more.

Mobile security facts and fiction


Our mobile devices are just as vulnerable as our computers. Test your knowledge and consider these facts and fictions about mobile security.

Mobile phones are safe and secure
Fiction. Your information, including emails, contacts, photos and location can be compromised through different avenues including apps, Wi-Fi networks and Bluetooth. That’s a scary thought considering that your phone stores more information about you than any other device.
You’re vulnerable on WIFI
Fact.
An unsecured wireless network can compromise your information. Anytime you connect to Wi-Fi you should know the source or if you use an unsecured network that you can’t trust, you could open the door to identity theft.
Apps protect our information
Fiction. Sometimes we unknowingly give a lot of information to apps we use only once. Keep in mind that some free apps we download are a scheme for companies to access, sell and profit off your data. Or worse, fraudsters who want to steal your personal information develop apps. A lot of times your information is still stored, saved and sometimes sold–even if you delete the app.
Getting “Website down for maintenance” message
Fact. Viruses or worms can be spread through anything you download from the internet, which means your phone is not immune to viruses or malware (malicious software). You can receive infected links from downloading infected files, clicking on links you receive via text, email or social media, and even through Bluetooth transfers.
Didn't know as much as you thought you did? Learn more about mobile security on the Help Hub.

How Coast Capital protects you

Your digital security is our priority. Here's how our digital banking helps you keep your information secure.
One-time security codes
One-time security codes
We’ll send a one-time security code via text message to your mobile phone or through an email when you complete specific tasks.
Security alerts
Security alerts
To protect you and your information, we’ll send you a security alert via email and text message when rare or suspicious activity takes place, like if your account is locked due to failed password.
Device management
Device management
In the event that you lose your phone or tablet, you can protect yourself and your information by disabling mobile access from a desktop computer.
Proactive fraud detection
Proactive fraud detection
We've enabled sophisticated fraud detection technology that assesses real-time risk based on a number of indicators related to your information and the device you’re using to log in.
SCO50 award
Need more help? Give us a shout.
Call us at 1.888.517.7000 Mon-Sat, 8am-8pm; Sun, 9am-5:30pm.